Cuckoo VM for Malware Analysis

If you do not want to put some time in installing your own Cuckoo Sandbox for different reasons, then you could just download the Virtual Machine (VM) that I have prepared. What I’ve done is get Cuckoo to run in a VM, so you might be asking what does that mean? Well, it means that first Cuckoo is running in a VM and second that Cuckoo will be running its analysis within another VM. Yes, a VM in another VM or what is technically called “Nested Virtualization“. I used VMWare for my VM, but since I’ve exported it to OVA, then you should be good to just import and run.
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Update: Hidden Prefetch Files Detection using New PECmd

Before diving into this post, I wanted to say, that I have been teaching digital forensics for a long time by now, and in my Operating System Forensics class, I use Eric Zimmerman‘s tools a lot, and when I say “a lot”, I truly mean it! The course is not about tools, but when it comes to using a tool to form an understanding of what that session was about, then you’ll always find a tool from Eric there (plus others for sure)! This is one thing about how great Eric’s tools are, but for me, there is more than that! Me and my students from time to time find new things, new bugs, etc. I sometimes send Eric a message from inside class and share a sample with him. We most of the times, get the solution fixed while we’re still in class! That is one of the best things about this guy, how much he cares about his tools, and how much support he provides the community! That is why, I doubt you’ll get such support even from a commercial vendor. They will never be able to get back to you this quick.

What does all that mean here? Well, continuing the previous work “Creating a Hidden Prefetch File to Bypass Normal Forensic Analysis” it means we just got a fix or a new feature added to PECmd :)
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Creating a Hidden Prefetch File to Bypass Normal Forensic Analysis

While doing more experiments of running EXEs and Malicious EXEs from ADS and Stealthy ADS to continue my previous work “Can We Say Farewell to Hiding Malicious EXEs in Stealth ADS“, and in order to create a forensic image and share it with the community as I mentioned here, I found some unusual findings!

When creating a forensic image, I also create a list of files and directories within that image, as seen in Figure 1, just for further checking and verification purposes. So, as usual, was doing the image to share and I noticed the following:

Figure 1: List of files found in a Forensic Image

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